WHAT IS THE BEST TYPE OF ROOF FOR SOLAR PANELS?

WHAT IS THE BEST TYPE OF ROOF FOR SOLAR PANELS?

Update on PV installations

With the increasing number of sales for solar panels in the Philippines, solar power is now becoming the most popular renewable energy source on a global scale. It is not just about reducing costs and saving money. Protecting the environment has become a top priority for the planet. Based on a study by IHS Markit, global PV installations are expected to reach a total of 34GW completed, in Q4 of this year alone. The market is expected to soar to double-digit growth. In 2019, there will be 11 million new connections to the internet of energy from solar systems existing in 2019. Yes, all regions of the globe are expecting growth in its solar PV installations for the year. In the United States in 2018, there were 2 million solar installations, and this is set to double in the next four years. In the Philippines, however, as of mid-year 2019, the numbers show that there are only a little over 2,100 net metered solar installations.

Why solar?

Why solar?

The number one reason that the general population is now installing solar panels is because it has become affordable and cost-effective. The cost of solar panels has decreased to more than 70% in the past decade. If you are environmentally aware and understand the benefits of clean, safe, sustainable and renewable energy, then now is the best time to consider installing solar panels on the roof of your home and business. The solar panel system will make your home or business energy efficient, reduce your carbon footprint, and increase the property value of your home or business. If you are thinking about installing rooftop solar, then you may have questions about whether solar panels can be installed on your roof type.

What kind of roof is good for solar?

Let us examine some important factors that determine whether you can install solar panels on your roof.

Age and condition of your roofAge and condition of your roof

It is critical to determine the condition of your current roof. It should be in good condition if you are going to install solar panels. Condition is different from the age of the roof. If your roof is more than five years old, then have a professional determine its current shape and condition, and see if it is ready for a solar panel system installation. If the roof is already near the end of its expected lifespan, then it may be wiser to replace it before installing solar panels. This ensures that the roof can support the solar panels. Solar panels typically have a warranty to 10 to 25 years and a life span of 25 years.

Material of Roofing

The roof type that is most compatible with solar panels is a flat roof or GI sheet roof. The material allows for easier installation. There are some roofing materials that are not ideal for solar panel system installations, such as wood and slate roofs because they are brittle.

Tilt of Roof

Tilt of roof

The tilt of the roof will determine the effect of energy production by your solar panel system. If the roof is too steep, such as over 40 degrees, then energy production and solar harvest is less. If the roof is flat, you can install solar panels and just have to use brackets to angle the panels.

Shape and Size of Roof

It is also important to consider the size and shape of your roof when thinking about installing a solar panel in the Philippines. A typical 5kWp solar panel installation will occupy about 30 square meters of surface area on the roof.

Shading and Sun Exposure

Shading and Sun Exposure

The amount of shading around your roof and the exposure of your roof to the sun can also affect the effectiveness of a solar panel system installation. There are instances when shade cannot be changed or removed, such as when your house is surrounded by buildings which block the sunlight on your roof. If your roof receives little or minimal sunlight, then rooftop solar or a solar panel system installation may not be the best option for you.

What’s the next step in installing solar panels?

With the right solar partner such as Solaric, the focus will be on the homeowner: to provide clean sustainable energy systems that are economically sensible and environmentally sound. Solaric selects and builds solar systems that are affordable, energy efficient, reliable, cost-effective, and provides the best value to clients. Our solar experts and installers are experienced working on any roof type and will make sure your system is installed to operate at maximum efficiency.

Turn on the sun

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable rooftop solar leader. Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar and remains the number one choice for corporate and industrial solar projects in the Philippines. Call Solaric at 0917.860.3141 or 0908.377.5577 or 5040092, or send an email to info@solaric.com.ph or visit www.solaric.com.ph for more details.

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IS SOLAR WORTH IT?

IS SOLAR WORTH IT?

Benefits of using solar panels in your home

5 Reasons to go solaric right now

The option to go renewable

Solar panel systems or solar panels in the Philippines are one of the greatest ways to reduce electric bills and offset energy costs, reduce your carbon footprint and the environmental impact of your home, and contribute to energy independence and a clean, safe, and sustainable future.

To install or not to install?

To install or not to install

If you are at the crossroads and deciding whether to install solar panels or not, here are the main questions to ponder. It is critical that all factors are taken into consideration before making that lifetime investment.

1. Do you want to reduce or eliminate your electric bill?

We live in the Philippines, where the average electricity price for homeowners is the second highest in Asia. It doesn’t stop there. Each year, the power rates surge, steadily going up higher as supply drops, demand boosts, and generation charges inch up. With a Grid Tie Solar Panel System, which is the most affordable and most popular of the solar systems, the solar panel system is connected to the electrical grid. When the sun is out, the house gets its power from the solar panels. When there is no sun (such as when it’s raining or at night time), the system uses electricity from the grid (which is the utility company, or Meralco). Likewise, if more power is generated by the solar system than is used by the house, then the excess energy is fed into the grid. This surplus power that the grid uses is credited by the utility company and is commonly referred to as the Net Metering Program. With a grid tie system on net metering, the home is likely to offset its nighttime power consumption with its daytime export. In doing this, the electric bill is drastically reduced. Sometimes, the bill is even eliminated. This has given birth to the solar trend in the nation today, otherwise known as the #ZeroBill.

2. Do you want to maximize usage of the sun?

Since the Philippines is a tropical country, the average home receives an average of 4.5 hours of sunlight per day. This makes Philippine homes, houses, facilities, structures, warehouses, offices, and buildings one of the best candidates in the world for solar. The sun is a free, unlimited resource, set to shine its light for another 5 billion years. With a solar panel system, the panels continue to draw energy even when the weather is cloudy. Even indirect or diffused sunlight will still power your house. Even cloudy days produce 10% to 20% of the power generated on sunny days. In other words, most especially in the Philippines, the solar panel system is working nearly all day long. It is your choice whether to take advantage of it or not.

3. Are you ready to make an investment with a 5-year ROI?

An investment in a solar panel system typically has a Return on Investment (ROI) of five years or less. That does not take into account the credits you may generate from exporting your excess power to the grid. If you consume all the power that your system generates, you will still achieve ROI in 5 years or less. On top of that, the warranty on your solar panels runs anywhere from 10 to 25 years. This means you generate electricity then have credits from your system for 10 to 25 years. Solar panel systems reduce or eliminate electric bills as soon as the solar is installed, plus they offer long-term savings. This makes the investment a win-win: economically profitable, payback guaranteed, and environmentally responsible.

4. Do you want to increase your home value?

A solar home will have a higher property value and a higher market value. As more and more people all over the world are educated about solar, the demand for solar homes and solar properties continues to increase. Most home or property buyers understand what a home with solar means. With a solar panel system already in place, with initial investment and installation already completed, statistics reveal that most homeowners recognize the resale value increase per installed kilowatt.

5. Do you want to help the environment and help combat climate change?

Solar panel systems use clean energy from the sun. With installed rooftop solar, your home will combat greenhouse gas emissions. This means your dependence on your utility company, which burns fossil fuel to produce electricity, will be less. With a solar home, you will be using a renewable energy source and you will reduce your carbon footprint. You will be directly contributing to a safer, cleaner, and more sustainable planet and future.

If your answers to each of the five questions above is Yes, then solar will most definitely be worth it for you. You will need to be innovative and forward-thinking to understand and embrace the shift to renewables of our modern day world.

Choosing the right solar partner

Choosing the right solar partner

With the right solar partner such as Solaric, the focus will be on the homeowner: to provide clean sustainable energy systems that are economically sensible and environmentally sound. Solaric selects and builds solar systems that are affordable, energy efficient, reliable, cost-effective, and provides the best value to clients.

Turn on the sun

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable rooftop solar leader. Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar and remains the number one choice for corporate and industrial solar projects in the Philippines. Call Solaric at 0917.860.3141 or 5040092, or send an email to info@solaric.com.ph or visit www.solaric.com.ph for more details.

MONO OR POLY SOLAR PANELS?

MONO OR POLY SOLAR PANELS

How to choose the right type of solar panels for your home or business?

Monocrystalline or Polycrystalline

Monocrystalline or Polycrystalline

What is the difference between Monocrystalline solar panels and Polycrystalline solar panels? To break it down simply, it is really all about the cells. In the overall solar system setup, both monocrystalline and polycrystalline solar panels available in the Philippines are made of silicon and perform the same function: the solar panels harvest the sun’s energy and convert it into electricity. Both kinds of panels are made from silicon.

Tell me about the key differences

Tell me about the key differences

Before making your final solar system decision on which panels your should choose, you should consider the key differences between monocrystalline solar panels and polycrystalline solar panels – and it is not just as simple as choosing the cheaper solar panels.

Silicon solar cell: Monocrystalline solar panels contain solar cells made from a single crystal of silicon, while polycrystalline solar panels contain solar cells made from many silicon fragments melted together.

Monocrystalline solar panels: These are referred to as premium solar, because they look better and provide better aesthetics to a house, and they have higher efficiency. In monocrystalline panels, the silicon is formed into bars and cut into wafers. The cell consists of a single crystal, thus, the electrons that generate a flow of electricity generally have more room to move. This is what causes the monocrystalline panels to be more efficient. Yes, monocrystalline panels are more efficient than their polycrystalline counterparts.

Polycrystalline solar panels: These solar panels are multi-crystalline or many-crystal silicon. typically have lower efficiencies than monocrystalline solar panels. The advantage of poly panels is their price, as they are cheaper than monocrystalline, thus making them more affordable.

Color: Polycrystalline panels have a blue hue. Monocrystalline panels have a black hue.

High-Density: Polycrystalline panels have a high power density.

Which solar panel is the right one for you?

Which solar panel is the right one for you

In selecting the right solar panels for your home or business, you must consider the following factors:

  1. Price
  2. Panel Efficiency
  3. Size of Solar Panel System
  4. Solar Harvest
  5. Sun Exposure
  6. Roof Space
  7. PV Layout
  8. Number of Panels
  9. Roof Aesthetics
  10. Warranty

After weighing out the advantages and disadvantages, and prioritizing them in accordance to what is important for you, your home, or your business, then you can make the right decision on whether to go mono or poly.

Choosing the right solar partner

Choosing the right solar partner

With the right solar partner such as Solaric, the focus will be on the homeowner: to provide clean sustainable energy systems that are economically sensible and environmentally sound. Solaric selects and builds solar systems and solar panels in the Philippines that are affordable, energy efficient, reliable, cost-effective, and provides the best value to clients.

Turn on the sun

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable rooftop solar leader. Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar and remains the number one choice for corporate and industrial solar projects in the Philippines. Call Solaric at 0917.860.3141 or 5040092, or send an email to info@solaric.com.ph or visit www.solaric.com.ph for more details.

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SOLARIC PRESIDENT VISITS AN EIGHTH GRADER AT INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL MANILA

SOLARIC PRESIDENT VISITS AN EIGHTH GRADER AT INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL MANILA

They share their a vision about a solarized future

 

On May 15, 2019, an eighth-grader from International School Manila (ISM) wrote a letter to the Solaric Founder and President, Mike De Guzman. In his letter, Marcel Miro said, “I am writing to you to applaud your efforts in helping those in need of electricity and making a cheap useful alternative. I have been very amazed by your effect on the Philippines alone. I have seen the videos of the people you have helped and I believe that your work could improve the lives of millions in need.”

 

Marcel

 

Marcel sees the advantages of Solar Energy in the Philippines and indicated his participation in a project called Advocating for Change, in which he was involved in researching about a world issue he was passionate about. His chosen topic was solar energy.

“I was inspired that you have stepped up to help your fellow citizens in a country where the government isn’t yet prepared to do so. I would like to praise you, and show my appreciation for your efforts and success in helping people,” said Marcel in his letter.

Marcel went on to share some of the critical data he had gathered in the course of his research, including the fact that there are 130 Million people in Southeast Asia alone without access to electricity. He also cited the challenges in creating widely available sustainable electrification.

In closing, Marcel invited De Guzman to the annual Advocating For Change (AFC) Day at ISM on May 31, 2019, to listen to Marcel present his final learnings, hopes, and dreams for a solar future.

Upon receiving the letter, De Guzman answered all the questions asked by Marcel in his letter.

“As you may know it’s the creation of greenhouse gases that are accelerating these changes. Most of mankind’s socio and political wars involve energy rights and resources,” emphasized De Guzman.

De Guzman took it a step further and canceled his morning meetings at the office just to actually head out to ISM on AFC Day. Marcel and De Guzman had a substantial chat about solar and life.

Mike and Marcel

 

“You see something that other people don’t,” said De Guzman.

The witty and passionate 13-year-old replied, “My mom and dad have instilled that in me. When I went to India, my dad took me to see even the dire parts of the country. Some of them didn’t have proper electricity, some dirty water, some insects. I saw parts and parcel of the hard life.”

“My vision of a renewable world? I think solar can be used for a lot of things, not just houses. Solar power plants, cars, air filters, everything – solar is easier for moving objects. It can all be used in conjunction for anything,” added Marcel.

Marcel dreams of studying technology in the future so that he can transform his visions into realities.

Click here to read the inspiring letter of Marcel Mirco.

CLEANING SOLAR PANELS: Who, What, When, Where, Why, How?

CLEANING SOLAR PANELS: Who, What, When, Where, Why, How?

Do solar panels need to be cleaned? Is there a certain way that solar panels need to be cared for? What is the actual maintenance protocol for solar panels?

To help make things bright and clear for our homeowners, business professionals and entrepreneurs with solar panels in the Philippines, Solaric is here to answer the solar panel concerns. We look at what to clean them with, how to clean them, where the dirt came from, who should clean them, when and how often.

 

The usual suspects

The unusual suspects

The typical, common suspects that block solar panels are dust, leaves, and water. Such particles can cause regular problems because they build up and accumulate grime over the years. Usually, dust does not usually have an effect because sunlight can still shine through. Solar experts suggest that the rain will take care of the dust on the solar panels.

“The panel efficiency is reduced when there is accumulated dust, but it is a very minimal and insignificant number, approximately 5% or less,” said Jade De Guzman, Vice President of Solaric. “On the other hand, regular cleaning, even with that dust, will improve efficiency by about 5%.”

There are solar arrays or systems that are located in dusty areas, or highly polluted locations, or near farmlands, or beside main roads. In such instances, special attention should be given because these solar panels accumulate more dust and dirt, and thus require more frequent cleaning.

 

And then there’s bird poop

Solar professionals agree that the public enemy number one of solar: bird droppings. Solar panel systems with microinverters, which are inverters attached to each separate solar panel, are affected because when one panel is covered with bird droppings, that inverter will stop showing current flow.

 

Tilt and angle too

Tilt and angle too

Tilt or angle factor is another to consider. Flat solar panels will require more cleaning because water and dirt accumulated will leave residues.

 

Who you gonna call?

Cleaning solar panels can be done by yourself, but it is recommended to call in the professionals because they have the equipment and technical expertise to be on that roof, and falling off will not be a hazard.

 

How do I clean the solar panels?

How do I clean the solar panels?

For the DIY-ers, materials can easily be found at home. You just need water and a non-abrasive sponge to apply soapy water. Mild detergent can be used if the birds left their droppings, but do make sure that there are no harmful or strong chemicals that could be left behind on the solar panels. Make sure that you don’t scratch the solar panels in any way. You can use a normal hose, or even a pail and dipper. Do not use anything high-pressure, as it may cause damage.

 

Always safety first

Anyone who goes on a roof must take extra precautions. He must be in safety attire, with a hard hat and safety harness. There should be a rope attached to the safety harness to prevent the technician from falling to the ground.

To request to have your solar panels cleaned, call 5040092 or 09178603141, or email info@solaric.com.ph

 

Solaric is the leader in rooftop solar

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable distributor of solar panels in the Philippines and rooftop solar leader. Backed by decades of experience, Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar in the Philippines and has delivered significant cost reductions in electricity expenses, as well as milestone contributions to a cleaner, greener, and renewable future. Solaric is now building more corporate and industrial solar projects and offering the same cost reductions. The Solaric installers and engineers are well-known troubleshooting experts. They work hard to ensure that the solar panel systems run efficiently and seamlessly so that every single homeowner with rooftop solar can enjoy the benefits of clean and renewable power. Welcome to the new generation of solar and turning on the sun.

For more information, call 5040092 or 09178603141, email us at info@solaric.com.ph or visit www.solaric.com.ph

We will gladly explain to you how the system works, or schedule a survey so we can give you options for your home or business. At Solaric, we Turn on the Sun.

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TOYOTA DEALERSHIPS REV UP THEIR SOLAR POWERED AUTO MALLS

TOYOTA DEALERSHIPS REV UP THEIR SOLAR POWERED AUTO MALLS

Solar panels in the Philippines have helped many companies save on energy consumption and aided mother nature’s recovery. Solaric has installed rooftop solar for three Toyota car dealerships to date: Camarines Sur (99.9kWp, 377 solar panels), Batangas (99.96kWp, 357 panels), and North EDSA (31kWp, 120 panels). The three facilities now have a combined total of 230.86 kWp, consisting of 854 solar panels, which now powers a significant chunk of its power requirements and daytime operations.

Toyota Camsur

The solar system of Toyota CamSur will incur savings of a minimum of Php1.2 Million each year. Energized in November 2017 with a projected ROI of 6.2 years, the CamSur dealership’s solar harvest was an average of 10,087-kilowatt-hours per month. In the duration of 17 months, that amounted to a total of 181,570 kWh. This translates to reducing its carbon emissions so that it offsets the carbon dioxide emissions that come from 70.3 tons of coal burned. This is also equivalent to saving 2,417 tree seedlings grown for 10 years, and 61 hectares of forests in one year.

Toyota Batangas

Toyota Batangas

On the other hand, the solar array in Toyota Batangas incurs savings of at least Php1.3 Million each year. Energized in June 2017 with a projected ROI of 5.72 years or less, the Batangas dealership’s solar harvest was an average of 9,968 kWh per month. In the duration of 22 months, that generated a total of 219,300 kWh. This translates to offsetting the carbon dioxide emissions that come from 84.8 tons of coal burned. This equates to saving 2,564 tree seedlings grown for ten years, and 74 hectares of forests in one year.

“It is most certainly a wise and sound investment for car dealerships, because of two major reasons. One: the system pays for itself in 5 to 6 years. Two: operational expenses are reduced. It’s a win-win all around,” says Mike De Guzman, President of Solaric Corp. “Hopefully, more business executives and entrepreneurs begin to see that going renewable and installing solar is not only good for their bottom line – it’s also good for the environment.”

Is your business eco-aware?

Is your business eco-aware?

Entrepreneurs and business executives consider solar panels for businesses with hesitation because they have little awareness and grasp of the market, advantages, and effects that the solar panels will have on the business. Despite being aware that numerous Fortune 500 companies are adopting a solar mindset and utilizing renewable energy, thousands of global companies are still wary about green initiatives and environmental efficiency. In today’s eco-aware world, business professionals need to start considering installing solar panels at some point in the near future – not only to become environmentally sound but because it is most certainly a strategic financial decision for the business.

Installing a solar panel system for the business is a wise, significant, one-time investment that provides energy savings for 25 years.

Solaric is the leader in rooftop solar

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable rooftop solar leader. Backed by decades of experience, Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar in the Philippines and has delivered significant cost reductions in electricity expenses, as well as milestone contributions to a cleaner, greener, and renewable future. Solaric is now building more corporate and industrial solar projects and offering the same cost reductions. The Solaric installers and engineers are well-known troubleshooting experts. They work hard to ensure that the solar panel systems run efficiently and seamlessly so that every single homeowner with rooftop solar can enjoy the benefits of clean and renewable power. In the Philippines, solar panels will be widely used in the near future. Welcome to the new generation of solar and turning on the sun.

For more information, email us at info@solaric.com.ph or call 5040092 or 09178603141, or visit www.solaric.com.ph

We will gladly explain to you how the system works, or schedule a survey so we can give you options for your home or business. At Solaric, we Turn on the Sun.

SOLARIC COLLABORATES WITH THE GERMAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND UNIVERSITY OF MAKATI IN DEVELOPING ITS SOLAR TECHNICIANS COURSE

SOLARIC COLLABORATES WITH THE GERMAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND UNIVERSITY OF MAKATI IN DEVELOPING ITS SOLAR TECHNICIANS COURSE

Manila, Philippines – On May 28, 2019, Solaric Corp., the leader in solar rooftops and solar panels in the Philippines, collaborated with the German Chamber of Commerce and University of Makati (UMak) in a roundtable discussion at the Integration Room of UMak to develop and review the curriculum of UMak’s first-ever course for Solar Technicians. The course syllabus was jointly planned, discussed, and developed at UMak. The preparation for this technicians’ course for solar installers began in 2018, and it is nearing fruition and completion this year.

UMak is a public tertiary academic institution with 16 colleges and 3 academic centers catering to 17,000 students. One of the colleges, the College of Technology Management, is developing a program for solar technicians up to 100kW peak solar systems. Currently, TESDA training regulations for solar technicians are only for smaller sized systems such as 2kWp systems and below. UMak aims to develop an industry-wide acceptable training standard for solar technicians which can complement the current National Level Certification (NC) issued by TESDA.

As a major and globally recognized player in the solar industry, founder of Solaric and President Mike De Guzman was invited by Dr. Elyxzur Ramos, VP for Academics of UMak, to once again join the roundtable discussion. De Guzman is known for his solar advocacy, having trained over 5,000 individuals in his company’s trademark SOLAR101 and SOLAR202 courses in the last six years. This collaboration of industry leaders and experts aims to level up the current technicians and vocational programs in our country and to promote industry certification for qualified and deserving technicians.

Dr. Ramos emphasized, “Actually, we were also a pilot university of the K-12 educational system. We started grades 11 to 12 as early as 2012. Our goal is to ensure the employability of our graduates. There is a big demand for skilled workers. A career can be made if you are a very good technician.”

The pilot course will purportedly enable education in the renewable energy sector, which is currently a field and market in high demand.

De Guzman said, “The Philippines will have to add at least 800 Megawatts a year of solar generation, just so we don’t have to build additional coal plants. That equates to 120,000 homes and businesses with rooftop solar. To date, we only have a nationwide total of over 2,100 registered installations. If we want to reverse climate change, we have to make solar technologies attainable to everyday technicians and electrical practitioners. That needs formal vocational training like how they did it in Germany.”

Solar has been gaining traction in the RE sector around the world. In the Philippines, people still need to learn and become more aware and knowledgeable in the applications, implications, and effects of solar power and renewable energy. People must understand the basics, especially in terms of true capital and investment costs, and applications of solar solutions in smart and renewable energy projects. Though solar panels in the Philippines, has been growing in sales, as much more individuals are educating themselves about this fairly new technology.

To learn more about the solar technicians’ course, please visit the University of Makati.

To join Solaric for On-The-Job training, please visit the Solaric Showroom at 2320 Chino Roces Extension, Makati City and submit your resume to Human Resources.

Solaric is the leader in rooftop solar

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable rooftop solar leader. Backed by decades of experience, Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar in the Philippines and has delivered significant cost reductions in electricity expenses, as well as milestone contributions to a cleaner, greener, and renewable future. Solaric is now building more corporate and industrial solar projects and offering the same cost reductions. The Solaric installers and engineers are well-known troubleshooting experts. They work hard to ensure that the solar panel systems run efficiently and seamlessly so that every single homeowner with rooftop solar can enjoy the benefits of clean and renewable power. Welcome to the new generation of solar and turning on the sun.

For more information, call 5040092 or 09178603141, email us at info@solaric.com.ph or visit www.solaric.com.ph

We will gladly explain to you how the system works, or schedule a survey so we can give you options for your home or business. At Solaric, we Turn on the Sun.

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MORE THAN 2,000 SOLAR ROOFTOP HOMES LOWER THEIR ELECTRIC BILLS BY 30% TO 70%

MORE THAN 2,000 SOLAR ROOFTOP HOMES LOWER THEIR ELECTRIC BILLS BY 30% TO 70%

Solaric Corp. Vice President Jade De Guzman said that plans to introduce solar panels in Philippine homes will help manage the rising costs of electricity.

“We envision a nation that is powered primarily by solar. The Philippines has sun – so it’s about time we utilize this free, unlimited, renewable resource to our advantage. We all want a greener and cleaner future, for ourselves and for the generations to come,” said De Guzman.

In the last six years, Solaric Corp. has boomed its way to explosive growth, becoming the nation’s leader in solar panel installation and rooftop solar PV systems. As the race for solar began in the country, the clamor for rooftop installations surged, and Solaric rapidly turned on the sun one rooftop at a time, climbing its way to the top of the Philippine residential solar market.

 

Let’s examine the figures

According to research data of Solar Digital Squad Philippines, Solaric accomplished over 2,000 rooftop installations nationwide and deployed over 6 Megawatts of solar, including Commercial, Industrial, and Military projects. Additionally, Solaric has trained over 5,000 individuals in the last six years on solar and its applications, through their trademark workshop training courses known as Solar101 and Solar202.

Startup businesses are sprouting from all over the nation with the intent of entering the country’s booming solar space. Yet, Solaric remains on steady, solar ground with consistent deployment of its solar panels, inverters, equipment and resources, always keeping up with industry trends and forces, and always one step ahead of its competitors. Now the household brand for solar, Solaric surpassed all other solar panel installation Philippines providers based on: capacity financed, installations, megawatts, and market share.

 

Solar market leader

Solaric services the market through tailor-fit turnkey solar solutions that manages everything from start to finish: engineering, design, supply, installation, energization, net metering, and aftersales support. Capitalizing from years of solar system installations, years of technical solar training, and years of serving as the solar resource experts for the corporate sector and key energy officers, Solaric has created a vast network of solar advocates, partners, and installers. This has cultivated its continued success and its own spot in the sunlight.

 

Number one goal is to reduce costs

Efficiency is the target bottom line. Homeowners need to identify their needs: Is there a need to lower monthly electric bills? Are you willing to make that one-time wise business and environmental investment? Do you want to increase revenue? Do you want to reduce your carbon footprint? Do you want to contribute to a safer, cleaner, and sustainable planet?

 

How to get started

The typical process begins with the homeowner sharing some of the essentials: daytime appliances used and amount of monthly electric bill. After validating their need for solar, a site inspection is conducted by solar engineers. The solar professionals now examine the site, roof, solar capacity, surrounding area, and evaluate the solar project potential or capability. They analyze the power bills of the past months. They determine the most appropriate solar panel installation for the home. They design a solar system that could produce enough power to meet the home’s consumption or usage. PV design is then prepared along with a site survey report and proposal. After discussion and contract signing, equipment delivery and installation ensues. The distinguishing factor of the Solaric team is that they assist you every step of the way – even in the application and processing of the Net Metering Program with the utility company. After energization, the after sales team takes over and provides maintenance services year on year. The entire process is technical but direct.

 

Choosing the right one

With the right solar partner such as Solaric, the focus will be on the homeowner: to provide clean sustainable energy systems that are economically sensible and environmentally sound. Solaric selects and builds solar panels in the Philippines that are affordable, energy efficient, reliable, cost-effective, and provides the best value to clients.

 

Turn on the sun

Solaric has established its name across the renewable industry as a proven and reputable rooftop solar leader. Solaric has installed more than 50% of residential rooftop solar, and remains the number one choice  for corporate and industrial solar projects in the Philippines. Call Solaric at 0917.860.3141 or 5040092, or send an email to info@solaric.com.ph or visit www.solaric.com.ph for more details.

At Solaric, we Turn on the Sun.

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OPEN LETTER TO THE 18TH CONGRESS OF THE PHILIPPINES

OPEN LETTER TO THE 18TH CONGRESS OF THE PHILIPPINES

Recently, the Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) presented its Draft Amended Rules Enabling the Net Metering Program for Renewable Energy, which included some controversial highlights. In connection with the issues that were discussed during the Public Consultation on the Proposed Amendment of Resolution No. 9, Series of 2013, A Resolution Adopting the Rules Enabling the Net Metering Program for Renewable Energy and Draft Amended Net Metering Agreement, held last May 17, 2019 at the Energy Regulatory Commission in Ortigas Center, Pasig, I am respectfully informing you of some regulatory updates on solar panels in the Philippines, renewable energy, and net metering.

Net Metering is the process protected by RA 9513 to allow everyday consumers to participate in building the nation’s electricity supply from interconnecting home solar systems to the grid. This vital program allows the consumer to trade their excess energy for credits, which has proven successful in other countries all over the world.

Since its introduction in 2013 here in the Philippines, there have been at least 2,100 net metered installations, which is equivalent to 20 MWp of new generation assets with an oil-displacing potential of 390 thousand barrels of oil. However, net metering is still in infancy with less than 1% of 1% of coverage and gross generation.

In the Draft Amended Rules Enabling the Net Metering Program for Renewal Energy released by the ERC, albeit some positives, there are proposed revisions that make the program less pro-consumer, less pro-utility, and less pro-masses. Such suggestions are in violation of key sections of RA 9513 (Renewable Energy Act) and in gross favor of the utilities, with willful ignorance of consumer rights and valuations for the contributions to the national grid.

 

Credit Grabbing: Interconnection Setup, RPS Meter, Export of Energy, Solar Tax

What I find contentious is the computation of the Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS). Meralco and ERC are clamoring to base it on GROSS generation of the entire solar output, which includes the self-consumption component of a consumer owner solar equipment. The Draft Amended Net Metering Agreement even stipulates that the DU shall install another meter in proximity to the RE system to measure the total RE generated, and these costs should be shouldered by the end user, not the DU who reaps the benefit. It should be reiterated that RPS should be based on exported energy traded to the DU. Total RE generated is not the DU’s concern and it is also not subject to the total generation cost of the DU, because it was power generated by the Qualified End User (QE).

Instead of the RPS being a monitoring factor to encourage more renewable energy, it has essentially been weaponized to raise the cost of Net Metered installations and decrease benefits to the host consumer who has spent thousands or millions for a solar setup. This creates a disincentive for the consumer to go solar, junk participation in the net metering process or even report their solar system to authorities for a safety inspection.

RPS valuation on the gross generation of a consumer-owned solar installation is wrong because the RPS should be based on energy sent to the grid, or exported energy. This is not any different from when a DU sources RPS compliant RE dispatched energy from a distant Hydro or Geothermal plant. Exported energy already represents the actual energy that the DU trades in as part of its RPS requirement. They should have no financial stake in the internal self-consumption or RPS from a consumer-owned RE plant or solar setup as it happens behind the meter, or outside their jurisdiction. Again, this is not supported in the law and against the principle of Section 17 of the RE Act, which exempts RE installations from universal charges for the generator’s own consumption.

The most onerous is the inclusion of a “SOLAR TAX”. They will install a generation meter between the inverter and interconnection of loads to measure total output and charge the consumer missionary, UCMD, Lifeline, and FIT all fees for the total solar production, a majority of which is self-consumed and does not pass public domain right of way or franchise area assets.

The presence of the RPS meter is what the utilities want, as it acts as a forty thousand peso barrier in putting individual solar installations, and lets them illegally recover “lost income” from a generation asset that they do not own, permit, or maintain.

 

Usurious Computations, 1:1 Ratio, and Pricing

Another critical element is that ERC is ignoring the pricing methodology set forth in the original RA 9513. This is contradictory to the definition of net metering and standard global practice. Net Metering as defined in RA 9513, means if you export Meralco 1kWh of energy, its 1kWh value is applied towards consumption. What ERC did was value it less than half or at blended generation rate. To put into figures, Meralco sells power to consumers at P11.50, but buys from the consumer at P5.50 or blended generation charge. The solar industry has been patiently waiting for 6 years now, and this material breach of a Republic Act has not been remedied. Numerous academes, world practices, and legal descriptions of net metering as enshrined in the law are contradicting to this practice. Complaints have been filed by a number of NGO groups and consumers but there is continued contempt on valuing it at pro-utility blended generation charge.

As of today, with over 2,000 installations and assuming 30 percent of the 20 MWp of solar generation is exported, the valuation at P5.50 vs P11.50 causes the 2000+ Net Metering customers to be shortchanged by an estimated P54 Million pesos a year. This is a travesty on part of the regulatory bodies as this constitutes state-sanctioned plunder of GWh to consumers who spent thousands on solar installations.

The defense furnished by the ERC is that if ERC follows the law, the rates of people without solar would go up. This flies in the face of conventional wisdom that historically shows that retail rates are widely affected when supply is low, especially during peak daytime hours, with billions of pesos spent on peaker generation plants that are diesel and oil-driven. These plants dispatch energy at much greater amounts than the entire net metering program and at kWh values HIGHER than retail rates that Net Metering calls for. Our country simply needs more energy, and we should not restrict it with pro-monopoly policies.

 

Technical Knock Out

There are also some moves to technically knock out solar with “special” Only in the Philippines requirements. The Philippine solar installer industry was not consulted or invited during the drafting of the Philippine Distribution Code of 2017. As a result, it is interesting to note that there are “special” clauses to limit solar interconnections utilizing equipment not available in the WORLD market such as ten-minute reconnection times when grid power resumes. This is in contrast with the European standard for reconnecting under one minute or even the United States reconnection time of 5 minutes. We recommend a review of the 2017 Philippine Distribution code, seek an amendment of publishing of an updated 2019 code that takes into the account the rapid development of microgrid technologies, frequency and voltage support from DERs and consumer/utility scale battery systems and e-vehicles.

 

Not For the Masses

I would not imagine the DUs to stoop this low, but they are also seeking the automatic denial of lifeline subsidy for people consuming less than 100kWh a month or P1k bill if they avail of solar net metering. If you have a solar panel in the Philippines, you are not poor and unworthy of the subsidy. In short, the message Meralco is conveying is loud and clear: if you are not in the upper class, then you cannot go solar. This is because Class C and below cannot avail of net metering, because the permits and fees would cost MORE than the solar panels themselves. The net metering permitting alone for small solar setups such as 540wp or 1kWp cost more than the solar panel systems themselves.

 

Removing Batteries

Batteries give energy reserves for brownouts, bad weather, and power outages. This translates to savings when the technology improves and smoothens out demand-supply curves. However, the best minds from the DUs and ERC are saying batteries should be removed. The DUs want to specifically remove batteries for net metered installations because they simply want to protect their business – despite climate change, global warming, and purported claims that there will be an oversupply if too many people have solar. Our current concerns revolve around power shortages, and yet their ultimate priority is to maintain their monopoly and maximize every potential channel to charge fees. Solar penetration amongst consumers at this current time is 1% of 1%, indicating that the executive branch of Government has not yet done enough. We are actually promoting an energy policy that screams “Coal Pa More”, and it is detrimental to national interest and foreign reserves. Even worse, it endangers the economic and ecological survival of our children.

 

End game

If the proposed draft amended rules are approved and implemented, we as a nation will be taking many steps backward. This will actually discourage people to install RE systems, avail of net metering and permit installations. Another result is that many will be forced to consider underground RE system installations. There is already significant reluctance of the public and even the DUs themselves after 6 years of net metering. Two thousand connections from a country with a 105 Million population is an insignificant statistic. Only 20 utilities and cooperatives out of the 120 DUs and coops show up and declare that more has to be done.

If history were a teacher, these very similar heavy-handed tactics have transpired in the earlier years of solar – in Nevada, Spain, Hawaii, and Florida. It is interesting to note that they have reversed those pro-utility policies and the public consistently voted the officials who have sided with utility profit interests out of office.

We have to take this to battle. We want a consortium of solar installers and stakeholders to take this to ERC and other policymakers because we believe in standing up for what is fair for the Filipino people. I am appealing for your time and support in helping us enable a Net Metering Program for Renewable Energy that makes sense. After all, we are one and aligned in steering the nation towards a clean and sustainable future. I look forward to your continued guidance as we forge ahead towards accomplishing our shared commitment to serve the best interests of our fellow countrymen.

 

Respectfully yours,
A Concerned Citizen

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THE NET METERING PUBCON: WHAT’S NEW?

THE NET METERING PUBCON: WHAT’S NEW?

Net Metering PubCon

The Energy Regulatory Commission (ERC) facilitated a Public Consultation on Net Metering on May 17, 2019, in Ortigas Center, Pasig City. The ERC has started conducting public consultations on the implementation of Net Metering 2.0. Since its introduction in 2013, there have been at least 2,100 net metered installations, which is less than 1% of 1% of coverage and gross generation. So how does this affect solar energy in the Philippines?

“The ERC has released the Draft Amended Rules Enabling the Net Metering Program for Renewal Energy, with proposed revisions that make the program less pro-consumer, less pro-utility, and less pro-masses,” said a renowned solar advocate.

 

What PSSEA has to say

Philippine Solar Storage Energy Association (PSSEA), formerly Philippine Solar Alliance, has submitted a number of proposed revisions, comments, and recommendations for the new upcoming IRR. ERC is clamoring to base the computation of the Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) on the gross generation of the entire solar output, which includes the self-consumption component. The Draft Amended Net Metering Agreement stipulates that the Distribution Utility (DU) shall install another meter in proximity to the RE system to measure the total RE generated. Shouldn’t the RPS be based on exported energy traded to the DU? Why is the DU insisting on subjecting total RE generated to fees? This results in the solarized consumer being subjected to a buffet of fees, surcharges, subsidies, simply because of the gross production of his RE system. This creates a disincentive for the consumer to go solar, or even report their solar system to authorities.

 

Gross generation or exported energy?

Questions are surfacing from all parties everywhere. The battle is between valuation on either gross generation or on exported energy. Exported energy represents the actual energy that the DU trades in as part of its RPS requirement. The question remains: Should the DU have a financial stake on the internal self-consumption of a consumer-owned RE plant or solar setup? Is this supported by RA 9513, otherwise known as the Renewable Energy Act, which exempts RE installations from universal charges?

 

Then there’s the buzz about solar tax

“The most onerous is the inclusion of a type of solar tax,” said another solar professional, “the proposed amendments even include installing another meter between the inverter and interconnection of loads, to measure total output and charge the consumer all sorts of fees, missionary, UCMD, lifeline, FIT All for the total solar production. How is that even beneficial for the homeowner? If the proposed draft amended rules are approved and implemented, we as a nation will be taking many steps backward. This will actually discourage people to install renewable energy systems, avail of net metering and permit installations. Another result is that many will indulge in underground RE system installations. These very similar tactics have happened in the course of the earlier years of solar – in Nevada, Spain, Hawaii, and Florida.”

As the series of PubCons ensue, let us wait and see what the future of RE and solar energy in the Philippines has in store.

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